Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Advisory: DOLE mediates brewing dispute as Cavite EPZA factory threatens closure

MEDIA ADVISORY
April 27, 2016
Contact: Dennis Sequena @ 09301803072

DOLE mediates brewing dispute
as Cavite EPZA factory workers restive anew
WHAT: Mediation meeting called by DOLE between union and management of Korean-owned factory
WHEN: Tomorrow, April 28, 2016, 10:00 a.m.
WHERE: NCMB Imus @ MYP GBY Building, Bayan Luma 7, Aguinaldo Highway
DETAILS:  With just a few days to go until Labor Day, a new labor dispute is brewing in the Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC), an electronics subcon in the Cavite EPZA. The Department of Labor and Employment is convening a meeting between the union and management to avert another strike.
After 18 workers earlier dismissed for union activities were reinstated as part of an agreement to end a five-day strike two weeks ago, the management of SYTIC is pushing through with the shutdown of the company on May 4.
The SYTIC labor union, which comprise a majority of the workers and is in the process of being certified as the sole and exclusive bargaining agent, asserts that the closure is illegal because it is intended to subvert the exercise of freedom of association and bust the union.
In response, the SYTIC union has called for negotiations with management about the impending closure and the reported takeover by its customer C-Pak Pte Ltd, a Singaporean company. Moreover the SYTIC union is calling for the absorption of the present employees into the new company, should the takeover push through. C-Pak Pte Ltd is owned by the group Dou Yee of Singapore. ###

SYTIC workers fight continues as company plans to shutdown

 

The workers of Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC), a subcontractor for big US electronics companies and is based in the Philippines’ biggest export zone, are once more facing a fight in their exercise of freedom of association. After 18 workers earlier dismissed for union activities were reinstated as part of an agreement to end a five-day strike, the management of SYTIC is pushing through with the shutdown of the company. Last April 25, management filed for permanent closure.

The SYTIC labor union , which comprise a majority of the workers and is in the process of being certified as the sole and exclusive bargaining agent, asserts that the closure is illegal because it is intended to subvert the exercise of freedom of association and bust the union.

In response, the SYTIC union has called for negotiations with management about the impending closure and the reported takeover by its customer C-Pak Pte Ltd, a Singaporean company. Moreover the SYTIC union is calling for the absorption of the present employees into the new company, should the takeover push through. C-Pak Pte Ltd is owned by the group Dou Yee of Singapore.

The Labor Department has called for a conciliation meeting on April 28 in an affort to resolve the brewing labor dispute. In the meeting, the union will table its twin demand of absorption of the present employees and their participation in the transition talks between SYTIC and C-Pak. The union’s call to participate in the transition talks is in line with the provision of the Philippine Constitution that workers shall be afforded the right to participate in policy and decision-making processes affecting their rights and benefits.

April 26, 2016

Monday, April 25, 2016

Presidentiables dared to offer policy steps to end endo


The partylist group Partido Manggagawa (PM) dared presidential candidates to propose policy steps to follow through on their commitment to stop contractualization. In a televised presidential debate last night, all five candidates promised to “end endo.”

“It is obvious that the presidentiables played to the crowd by declaring their intent to end endo but it was all too clear that they gave no concrete proposals on regulating much less eradicating the epidemic of contractualization. Either they have a shallow or erroneous understanding of the roots of contractualization,” averred Rene Magtubo, chair of PM and also its first nominee for the partylist elections.

“In deeds not by words should the presidentiables be judged on the issue of contractualization,” insisted Magtubo. PM, along with other labor groups, have been campaigning for the passage of the Security of Tenure bill that has languished in Congress for nearly a decade.  The bill seeks to regulate contractualization by setting a cap on the number of non-regular workers and amending provisions of the Labor Code on subcontracting and outsourcing.

The group noted that none of the presidentiables who are solons pushed for the Security of Tenure bill while those who are local executives employ job order workers, the equivalent of contractual employees in the public sector, in their city halls.

“Mar Roxas deserves special mention for countenancing the outsourcing of Philippine Airlines employees in 2011 while he was cabinet secretary and threatening to file economic sabotage against PALEA members who fought contractualization in the national flag carrier,” stated Gerry Rivera, PALEA president and also PM partylist nominee.

He added that the “Contrary to the misconception of a few presidentiables, contractualization is expressly allowed by the law and is merely regulated but not prohibited. Moreover, lax inspection and enforcement by the Department of Labor and Employment worsens the situation.”

“This stems from the view of government that employers have to be encourged to invest and shifting from regular to contractual labor is part of the package. Thus it is worrisome that even as the presidentiables profess desire to end endo, in the same breath they want to placate employers by providing more incentives. We won’t be surprised that whoever becomes president will simply cave in to the employers’ lobby on the alibi that contractualization is necessary to generate more investments,” Rivera elaborated.

April 25, 2016

Migrant teachers para sa PM partylist #101




Saturday, April 16, 2016

Workers reinstated in deal to end Cavite EPZA strike



The five day strike at an electronics subcon in the Cavite EPZA, the country’s biggest export zone, ended yesterday with the reinstatement of workers earlier fired for union activities. Striking workers of Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC) will go back to work next week, including eighteen illegally terminated employees, in a deal reached at a mediation meeting convened by the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE). Two retrenched workers earlier accepted the separation offer of management and are not covered by the agreement.

“We will report for work with our heads held up and with our dignity as workers recognized. We owe this victory to the determination of our union members who paralyzed the operations of SYTIC for almost a week and forced management to accede to our just demand for reinstatement. We hope this is the start of management’s change of heart that it needs to give workers their due and respect their rights,” stated Frederick Bayot, president of the SYTIC workers union.

The striking SYTIC workers earlier threatened to escalate protests inside and outside the Cavite EPZA if their demands were not met. More than a hundred members of the partylist group Partido Manggagawa (PM) and the union Philippine Airlines Employees Association (PALEA) occupied the DOLE office in Imus, Cavite while the mediation meeting was ongoing yesterday. While Thursday night the SYTIC strikers and their supporters marched around the export zone and hopped from one factory to another to solicit support from EPZA workers.

Union officers and members were fired by SYTIC management in an attempt to bust the union that was formed to address numerous workplace issues. SYTIC workers complained of wages that partly are not paid in cash but in the form of meals, illegal deduction on wages for company events, non-payment of overtime due to an illegal compressed workweek schedule, and the lack of a company nurse, doctor and hospital bed, as provided for in the Labor Code.

“We call on the DOLE to act on the complaint we earlier filed at the provincial office about labor standards violations at SYTIC to ensure that they are appropriately and promptly addressed,” Bayot insisted.

He added that “We also would not have won without the solidarity of fellow workers in other EPZA factories and labor groups like PM, PALEA and Sentro who extended moral and logistical support for our picketline. The workers united will never be defeated.”


SYTIC manufactures plastic products that provide protection to integrated circuits and electronic components from physical and electrostatic discharge during storage and shipping. Its three biggest customers are ON Semiconductor Philippines Inc. in Carmona, Cavite, Analog Devices General Trias Inc. in the Gateway Business Park in General Trias, Cavite and Texas Instruments factories in Baguio and Clark ecozones. All are local subsidiaries of US multinational companies. ON Semiconductor is a spinoff of Motorola. SYTIC also supplies to Cavite-based factories of local subsidiaries of US electronics companies Maxim Integrated and Cypress. It exports part of its production to C-Pak Cergas in Malaysia.

April 16, 2016